Waiting To Be Matched – The Impact

 

 

Kids process time differently than adults do, especially when they are waiting for something special. For kids wanting a mentor, a friend, or someone to help them, being on a waiting list can feel like it takes forever.

“Waiting to be matched with a Big Brother or Sister can seem like it takes a long time,” said Adriana Adams, BBBS Customer Relations Supervisor. “And they take it personally. Kids think ‘There’s something about me that means I can’t get a mentor.’  Parents are more understanding and have better perspective.”

Though they’re understanding, however, waiting is hard on parents as well. “We have parents who are looking for help, who are going through a hard time,” said Adriana. “And they have nowhere else to go. It is really hard to have to tell them that we can’t match their child right away.”

“People will call and tell us stories that show just how much their child needs a Big,” said Ellen Harsch, Enrollment Supervisor. “For example, a mom will say, ‘My child is having a real hard time in school and getting into trouble,’ or ‘My child has been getting into fights since his dad went to jail,’ or ‘My child seems lonely since his dad died.’ Sometimes it can be one hard story after another. And everyone who calls deserves a Big. The family may be going through something that is so hard for them, and one way we can support and help them is to provide a friend, but it’s not something we can just snap our fingers and do immediately because the demand exceeds our staff capacity.”

BBBS’ staff members let parents and children know about the expectations for getting matched, but that doesn’t always make it any easier for families, or for staff, when children are put on the waiting list. “It’s always hard and sad to say ‘No.’ And it’s hard on us as staff because we know how much good a mentor can do,” Ellen continued. “We know that if we could get these kiddos matched we could really make a difference in impacting their lives in a positive way.”

The kids waiting to be matched know that having a mentor can be positive too, as their comments reveal. “One Little Brother said that he wants a mentor because he wants someone he can hang out with and talk to,” said Christina Eisenlord, Enrollment Specialist. “Another Little is the oldest child in his family with a lot of responsibility and he needs some space away from the chaos within the house.”

“One Little Sister is super excited about the possibility of getting a Big Sister because she says she really needs help in school,” Christina continued.

For some of the kids on the waiting list it’s about the companionship of having an adult friend. “One Little Sister hopes to get a Big Sister because she doesn’t want to be lonely,” Christina added. “Her mother has breast cancer and she really wants someone to talk to. She wants more than just fun activities because she’s struggling with what is going on with her mom.”

As new matches get started, it’s exciting to imagine what their futures might hold.

“Once a match begins there’s so much good that can come from it. We see that over and over as Bigs, Littles, and family members move through life events together. While the wait can be a challenge, the benefits, opportunities and relationships that come from being matched can truly last a lifetime,” Ellen said.

Big Brother Chris agreed. “When we first got matched, Keon was a little shy,” he said about his Little Brother Keontray. “He’d talk about his day and I’d ask him all sorts of questions about his life and he’d share if he wanted to.”

“The wait to be matched with Keon was definitely worth it. Since Day One, seeing Keon once a week is the highlight of my week, every single week. The best part is that Keon adds just as much to my life as I do his. He inspires me to be a better person, and to keep pushing through school and work and life. He’s a brilliant kid and I believe in him 100%. I’d do anything for him and his family on any day.”

Is being on the waiting list hard? Yes.

Is it worth the wait? Absolutely!

Big Brothers Big Sisters’ Waiting List

Big Brothers Big Sisters works hard to match as many kids who want mentors as possible. Unfortunately, matching all of the kids who apply doesn’t just automatically happen. Consequently, kids end up on our “waiting list.” We talked with Joe Strychalski, BBBS’ Vice President of Programs, to explore why this happens and how more kids can be moved off the waiting list and into the mentoring relationships they need and deserve.

What is BBBS’ “waiting list” and who is on it?

JS: We always have far more kids and parents who inquire about getting matched with a Big Brother or Sister than we can accommodate (match). Our “waiting list” consists of those kids/families who have inquired about getting matched, but who we can’t immediately start in the enrollment process. We keep all of their information, and when we reach the point where we can actively start looking for a match for them, we’ll call them to set up an interview and get them started in the process.

We try to be open, upfront and realistic about matching kids.  Our goal is that anyone we interview and take through the full enrollment process is someone we feel we can find a great match for – and quickly.  This is the best use of staff time, makes for the most effective matches, and gives kids/families the most realistic picture of our ability to match them with a Big Brother or Sister.

Why do we have a waiting list?

JS: Two things: supply and demand, and money.

Every BBBS agency I know of receives more inquiries from kids/parents than 1) inquiries from volunteers, and 2) than they can effectively match.  Part of the challenge is that typically about 70% of inquiries are to enroll Little Brothers, while only about 30% of inquiries to volunteer are from Big Brothers – so there’s a major imbalance in folks coming into the program.  We typically have around 600 kids on our waiting list and around 80% or more of those kids are boys.  Big Brothers who come into our program, who enroll, and who are approved, get matched very quickly, but we never have enough men volunteering to fill the need.

By money, we mean contributions and revenue to help us hire more staff to serve more kids. Throughout our process, each department (Customer Relations, Enrollment and Match Support) consistently operates at full capacity.  For example, we have a team of about 8 Match Support Specialists who introduce new Bigs and Littles and support existing matches.  We estimate that each MSS can support 85-90 matches at most and still maintain a high level of service to their matches.  This level of quality is critical to our ability to achieve positive outcomes for each of the kids we match. We could serve more kids at a lower level, but that would negate much of the impact that we see in high-quality, professionally-supported mentoring relationships.  Over the last year, our entire staff has been operating at 98-100% of our projected capacity in every area.  We’re doing our best to have the biggest impact on as many kids as we can.  If we were able to hire more staff, we could serve more matches and move more kids off the waiting list and through the process more quickly.

What is the impact of the waiting list on some of our matches? Are there situations where one sibling is matched and another is not?

JS: We do our best to move families through the process together and not leave one sibling matched and another or others waiting for very long.  Again, we want to make the best possible matches, but we consider all siblings in a family when we start the enrollment process.

We also do our best to keep siblings on the same Match Support Specialist caseload.  Our staff do a great job of establishing trust and healthy relationships with each of our families and often, it’s best when one staff member can be the point of contact for families with multiple kiddos.

 The waiting list has gone down. What have we done to achieve this success?

JS: Over the last year, our Customer Relations team has done a great job of reaching out to those on the waiting list to ensure that families are still engaged with us as well as looking for kids we are likely to be able to match more quickly.  We have received some funding from grants and foundations that has helped us to serve populations that can often be a bit harder to match.  We have also been tracking our volunteer inquiries closely and looking for kids on the waiting list who are likely to be a good fit for the volunteers who are coming into the program.  Along with this, we have been starting with those who have been on the waiting list the longest and trying to move these kids forward more quickly than we’ve been able to in the past.  Often when we have parents/guardians and kids who inquired a year or two ago, who have patiently been waiting to start the process, and who continue to want to be in the program – these are the kids and families who will thrive in a match.  They’re committed, engaged, and excited.

However, the wait list constantly fluctuates. At times, we have more than 700 kids waiting, and recently we’ve decreased that to around 500.  BUT, we typically receive more inquiries early in the year than throughout the summer and late in the year, so our list is likely to move back over 600 in the beginning of 2018.

How can people help? What is needed to reduce the list even further?

JS: We will always need more male volunteers and funding to serve more kids.

Male Volunteers – As mentioned, our wait list is almost completely full of Little Brothers wanting Big Brothers.  We never have enough men volunteering as Bigs. Of the approx. 600 kids waiting, about 500 of those are boys.

Also, typically about 90% of the young people we serve are from minority populations (mainly Hispanic and African-American), while nearly 70% of our volunteers are Caucasian. So about 450 of the young people on our waiting list are boys and young men of color.

Although we do match across ethnicities and see positive outcomes from these matches, Littles and families often ask to be matched with a Big of the same race/ethnicity, feeling that this Big may be able to better relate to the Little, and to understand the challenges they’re facing.

Regarding volunteer Bigs, we always have a need for men, men of color and bilingual Bigs (both male and female).

Funding – Even if we had an influx of hundreds of male volunteers, we wouldn’t necessarily be able to enroll and match them as quickly as we would like to because of the need for more staff to support them.

Is there still a need?

JS: Absolutely – and there always will be, particularly as our region grows.  BBBS will always have kids/families wanting mentors.  My hope is that, while we will always have a “waiting list,” we will start to be able to move people through the process much more quickly and efficiently.  And, instead of telling people that they’ll have to wait to be interviewed and start the process, we’ll be able to get them enrolled and immediately start looking for a good match.

One of the things we share with both families/kids and Bigs is that we never guarantee how long it will take to find a match. We would rather take more time to make a good match, than force a potential bad match to happen quickly. Creating quality matches is our highest priority.

Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Center Receives Sustainability Award

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas’ new Bennett-Rathgeber Mentoring Center has won an Austin Energy Green Building 3-star energy award. The award honors community structures that support a cleaner environment through efficient water and energy use and that provide healthy, comfortable spaces for staff, clients or residents.

The new mentoring center is part of the Mueller Redevelopment, a LEED Gold Neighborhood Development certified by the U.S. Green Building Council. The eco-friendly building opened its doors on January 25, 2016. Although the mentoring center is four times larger than the agency’s former facility, it takes only twice as much energy to run. A number of innovative features reduce energy use. The facility’s core support spaces use natural light reducing the need for artificial lighting, and an energy-efficient HVAC system reduces the system’s run time.

Situated on a public bus route, the building offers easy public access without a car, reducing gas consumption and emissions.

The building design also supports increased physical activity and employee wellness. On the second floor, the Youth Activity Center provides a place for Bigs and their Little Brothers and Sisters to relax or play games. During the week, staff use the space to practice yoga.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is proud to be part of such a forward-thinking community that supports a cleaner, healthier environment.  The site of a former municipal airport, Mueller offers a sense of community and multiple amenities. A blend of commercial and residential spaces, the Mueller neighborhood boasts parks, restaurants, a grocery store, apartments, and homes, all within walking distance.

Big Brothers Big Sisters’ new building aligns with the agency’s mission of creating brighter, healthier futures and outcomes for children.

The award was presented to BBBS’ CEO Brent Fields at a national Green Building Sustainability Celebration held at the Bennett-Rathgeber Mentoring Center on November 14th.

“Receiving this award is such an honor,” Brent said. “We strive to maintain an eco-friendly and sustainable environment. It’s exciting to know that this energy efficient building is helping us to make an even greater difference in our community.”

See pictures from the award celebration here

Photo credit Arnold Wells/SK photo. Images provided by Austin Energy.

About Big Brothers Big Sisters:

Big Brothers Big Sisters serves nearly 1,000 children in Travis, Williamson, Hays and Bell counties every year. For more than 46 years we have matched children, ages 6–16, with supportive adult mentors who build friendships and offer encouragement and support to each child, helping them discover opportunities and build skills that lead to success in life. Last year more than 98 percent of the children served by BBBS remained in school, improved or maintained their grades, and avoided early parenting. Children served by our program also attend college at rates that are twice the national average for their peers. For more information, visit www.BigMentoring.org.

About AEGB:

Since 1991, Austin Energy Green Building (AEGB) has been cultivating innovation in building and transportation for the enrichment of the community’s environmental, economic and human well-being. This mission is achieved through green building ratings, consulting services, code advancement, education and professional development. AEGB ratings raise the standards for energy efficiency, water quality and conservation, community compactness and connectedness, indoor environmental quality, material recourses and site development. The AEGB ratings are specific to Austin and reward sustainable building practices on a scale of one to five stars.

U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is a green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. To receive LEED certification, building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification. Prerequisites and credits differ for each operating system, and teams choose the best fit for their project.

Making a BIG Difference

Community engagement is an important part of Big Brothers Big Sisters’ work. Now, a new group is turning that emphasis on community inward in order to create a greater sense of connectivity between and among BBBS Bigs and matches.

The new group is called BIG – The Big Impact Group. It is made up of Bigs and other volunteers who are connected with BBBS. Launched in May, the group is using their networking skills and resources to help the organization as a whole.

“I’m so proud of being a part of this organization (BBBS), and I wanted more,” said Michaela Lindsay, a former Big Sister and one of the founders of the new group. “As Bigs, we all feel so strongly about our experiences that we wanted to create an additional sense of community between and among other Bigs.”

Michaela became aware of the need for this type of community when her own match came to an end as her Little Sister Aracely graduated from high school. “We were told that our match would be closing and we were kind of caught off guard by that because we hang out together all the time,” Michaela explained. “So, we approached BBBS about wanting to stay involved with the organization because it’s been such a positive experience for us.”

Michaela believed she had a lot of skills and resources to offer to help meet some of the organization’s needs, and she wanted to keep her Little Sister connected with the agency as well. “Aracely particularly wanted to give back to other high-school-aged Littles,” said Michaela.

Michaela met with Joe Strychalski, BBBS Vice President of Programs, and Christina Snell, Match Support Supervisor, to start the conversation. After months of research and collecting ideas, the Big Impact Group was formed. “We identified a few needs that we thought we might be able to help meet if we mobilized some of our most engaged Bigs and supporters,” said Joe. “Those needs were additional funding to help hire more staff to serve more kids; recruiting volunteers – specifically men, men of color, and bilingual Bigs; and better connecting our Bigs.”

Connecting Bigs seemed like a natural place for the group to start. BBBS matches have match support specialists who do exceptional jobs of helping Bigs in their one-to-one relationships with their Littles, but even with this help matches can sometimes feel isolated from other matches. The Big Impact Group is working on strategies to address this.

“I’ve met so many wonderful people in this group,” said Michaela. “They are passionate about mentorship and have dedicated a significant portion of their time to it. I was involved with BBBS for 5 years and never made these kinds of connections before. So, that has already been a huge benefit of this group!”

To help build connections, the Big Impact Group is launching a Facebook group for Bigs and plans to be a point of contact for future match events. “Sometimes you show up for a match outing like a Round Rock Express baseball game and don’t even realize you’re sitting next to another match,” Michaela continued. “We want to be a point of contact to say, ‘Hey, we’ll meet at this location before the game. Come say ‘hi’ and get to know other Bigs and Littles and help us build a greater sense of community.”

To help BBBS recruit new volunteers, the group has set a goal of enlisting 50 male Bigs. They are planning to use their personal networks to get information out to those who might not be familiar with the organization.  “We want to let people know what is involved and what it means to be a Big. Especially potential male mentors,” said Michaela. “We’re interested in making legitimate connections for BBBS staff to pursue. I’m involved in the MBA program at UT which is a predominately male group. There could be a lot of student interest in the program there.”

To support fundraising, the Big Impact Group has set a goal of raising $50,000 and is scheduling several fundraising events. “Our first event was the ‘Notworking for Charity’ event that we held in late July,” said Joe. “We raised about $8,000, had approximately 200 participants, and 20 people expressed an interest in becoming Bigs.”

The group also has plans for events that satisfy multiple goals such as the Dynamic Duo Fitness Challenge coming up on November 12. This event will give matches a chance to have fun and get acquainted, while also raising funds for BBBS. The group is working on several other events including SantaCon, which will take place downtown on December 9th.

“Our target member for the group is someone who is already connected with BBBS,” said Michaela. “The Big Impact Group is just getting off the ground so we’re interested in attracting additional members. We want to include people who are already familiar with the organization. For instance, there may be people out there who have participated in Bowl for Kids every year and who haven’t necessarily volunteered as Bigs, but who are fully aware of BBBS’ mission and who have been impacted by the organization.”

Membership requirements for the group include: a one-year commitment to the group and attendance at monthly meetings; supporting BBBS financially – as a Game Changer making monthly donations at any level, or making a meaningful personal contribution to BBBS; being a current or past Big/BBBS participant; being a young professional currently engaged with BBBS, or being someone who is interested in future BBBS Board service.

“If someone is interested in joining the group I visit with them first,” said Joe. “I go over the expectations and requirements of membership because we want to make sure people know that this is a working group first and that there are high expectations. There is a social, networking component to our efforts and it is a fun group, but we expect our members to bring their resources – whether time, talent or treasure –  to help us meet our goals.”

“I would love to have more members and to hear more about what Bigs are looking for out of their participation,” Michaela said. “There are professional organizations for everything from sports to fine arts. The Big Impact Group exists to enrich the experience of Bigs and matches, to help the agency with fundraising and recruitment needs, and to build further awareness of BBBS.”

Photo: Big Impact Group members. Back row: Stefan Sinclair, Joe Strychalski, Albert Swantner, Oliver Davis-Urman, Jeremy Giroir. Front row: Liz Garcia, Nicholas Johnson, Michaela Lindsay, Jonathan Lin Davis. Not pictured: Jeremy Cox, Tri Dang, Brett Keenan, and Ali Nichols. 

BBBS’ Spooktacular BIG Fall Carnival

It was a weekend filled with tasty treats, spooky costumes and exciting carnival games! On Saturday October 28th Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas hosted its annual BIG Fall Carnival. The unBOOlievable event welcomed approximately 300 children, families, and friends to BBBS’ Bennett-Rathgeber Mentoring Center in Rathgeber Village.

Bigs, Littles and staff members embraced the cold morning and made it a day to remember. Matches enjoyed each other’s company as they played carnival-themed games, created craft projects, and ate delectable Halloween candy.

“It is such a joy to hold this event every year,” said Brent Fields, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters. “It is great to see matches interacting with one another. Our staff enjoys this chance to spend time with matches as well. Bringing people together is what BBBS is all about, and this event is a great opportunity to do that.”

This year’s carnival featured activities including an inflatable slide, an inflatable wrecking ball game, soccer free throws, a beanbag toss, and jumbo Jenga. Not to mention the yummy treats such as shaved ice, freshly popped popcorn, and delicious chocolate covered fruit snacks donated by Edible Arrangements.

“This was my first year at the Fall Carnival,” said Ana, one of BBBS’s match support specialists. “I learned that kids will do anything for candy! I was able to spend one-on-one time with my matches, which was pretty awesome. That morning I even did a match introduction and the match was able to experience BBBS for the first time at the event. Overall, our Fall Carnival was great and very fun.”

Representatives from Austin’s Fire Department No. 14 and the Austin Police Department’s mounted patrol also took part in the festivities, showing and demonstrating their gear. They even allowed kids to climb to the top of the bright red fire truck and to pet their patrol horses.

Another great feature of this year’s carnival was the “Big Futures Live Forward Resource Fair” that took place inside the mentoring center.  The purpose of this event was to connect recent high school graduates and current high school Littles with resources for finishing high school, financial literacy, job training, and higher education.

Littles had the opportunity to check on their BBBS’ scholarships and to speak with representatives from organizations such as Austin Community College, Huston-Tillotson University, Peloton U, Goodwill’s Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Program, BB&T Bank, American Youth Works, and E4 Youth. There were also helpful promotional materials from St. Edward’s University and The Austin Chamber of Commerce’s Financial Aid Saturdays.

“It was awesome to see Littles and their Bigs really take their time at these booths to talk about the futures our Littles see themselves striving towards,” said Candace Bunkley, BBBS’ scholarship coordinator.

BBBS’ carnival brought together a diverse group of participants: Bigs, Littles and their families, board members, staff members, volunteers, community partners and friends, as well as children from our Rathgeber Village neighbor, Austin Children’s Services.

This event would not have been possible without the generosity and participation of numerous sponsors and volunteers. We offer special thanks to Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, Intersys Consulting, The University of Texas at Austin McCombs School of Business, Edible Arrangements, the Young Men’s Service League, the Austin Police Department, the Austin Fire Department, Bounce Around Austin, MyEventistheBomb, Kind Bars, Hapi Drinks, and General Motors, as well as those who were part of our Live Forward Resource Fair.

See additional Carnival photos in our Flickr album here

See event photo booth photos here

BBBS Today: A Conversation With Brent Fields

2017 has been a year of awards for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas, with the most recent award going to BBBS’ CEO Brent Fields, who was just named the Austin Business Journal’s Non-Profit CEO of the Year. In the past twelve months, BBBS of Central Texas has received recognition as an Austin Business Journal Best Place to Work, a BBBS National Gold Standard Agency award winner, a BBBS National Agency of the Year finalist, and a recipient of BBBS’ National Board of the Year award.

“I’d be lying if I didn’t say that this recognition has been great,” Brent said. “We – the staff, the board, our donors, our volunteers, our families, and our community partners – have been working hard for years. We didn’t just suddenly start getting it right. We’re just fortunate that at this moment in time we are really seeing the fruit of our labor.”

“This recognition means a lot to me personally because I think for years now a number of people have been trusting me, trusting our team, and trusting our vision,” Brent continued. “I love that so many of our supporters can feel they’ve made the right investment, and that our work provides a good return on their trust and support.”

Brent became CEO of BBBS of Central Texas in 2008 at a critical time for the agency. “When I came on board the agency had been in existence for 35 years and was well respected in the community. I found there was tremendous passion for the mission and that the agency had just come through an aggressive growth period relative to the number of kids served,” Brent explained. “Unfortunately, that growth was not sustainable. It required more infrastructure than the agency could afford, so we were immediately in crisis repair mode.”

To get the agency onto stable financial ground Brent utilized what at the time he considered his greatest strength – knowing what he didn’t know. “When I came on board, I spent a lot of time listening, observing and assessing,” Brent said.  “During my first days I was just trying to get my arms around the state of the organization, even bringing in an outside group to do an audit. That helped me quickly identify what our business should be, and what was most urgent in my role.”

In the decade since, the agency has evolved into a stark contrast of it’s former self. “Ten years ago we were in a building in need of repair, and now we’re in this amazing, beautiful, intentionally designed facility that not only suits our needs today, but will for decades to come,” Brent continued. “When I started, we had unpaid bills and little cash on hand. Now, we have what are considered to be best operating practices, operational reserves, and a $5 million dollar building that is paid for.

According to every metric you look at, whether related to staff, board, infrastructure, performance, morale, or programmatic outcomes, we’ve seen an amazing transformation. And this is not just because of my tenure. It’s because of all of the things that staff, donors, board members, volunteers, families and supporters have contributed to our work over the years.”

Some of Brent’s most meaningful memories at the agency revolve around those who have contributed. “I’ve been serving in some sort of leadership role for several decades, and some of the most treasured experiences I’ve had are things I’ve seen and experienced at BBBS,” Brent recalled. “I remember staff and board members and supporters enduring some really difficult days. People who hung in there with us and who showed they cared. Who believed that we would come out of the storm and that we would see better days. I remember that.”

Another memorable event occurred soon after Brent became the new CEO and decided to become a Big Brother. “I was semi turned down,” Brent laughed. “When I joined the agency I was immediately struck by the power of mentoring. So, it seemed logical that I should become a Big. I wanted to walk the talk. I told the program staff that I wanted to become a Big Brother and they said, ‘We’ll begin the process.’ In one of the enrollment interviews I noticed that the interviewer wanted to say something, but that she was uncomfortable. I finally said, ‘I feel a tension here. Could you just say what’s bothering you?’ And she said, ‘Well, Mr. Fields, I’m not sure you should be a Big Brother right now.’”

“I said, ‘Really? Could you tell me more about that?’  and she said, ‘You just became our new CEO, you’re a new dad to your third child, and you have a lot going on. Is this really the right time for you to take on a mentoring relationship with a vulnerable child who needs your full attention?’” Brent said. “And you know, the minute she uttered those words, I knew she was absolutely right. I went home that night disappointed that I shouldn’t be a Big at that time, but I’ve never been more proud of our program and of how we put kids’ needs first. That is a great example of the thought and intention that goes into what we do.”

A year or two later Brent did become a Big, when the time was right. “To this day, being a Big has been one of the most transformational experiences of my life,” Brent continued. “But it does say a lot about fit and timing. And we’re really good at figuring that out and at helping people determine when the time to volunteer is right.”

Getting it right. Making an impact in a child’s life. It’s one of the things Brent loves about BBBS. “So many non-profits define their success in terms of how big their budget is or how many clients they serve,” Brent said. “I love that we don’t just count activities and clients, but we count impact. I think it’s crucial in this day and age when there is so much need and it’s so important to use every dollar wisely, that you know what kind of impact you’re having. It’s not enough that we serve 1,000 kids a year, it’s important that we know we’re making a difference in their lives. I love that about this organization. It’s what gets me up in the morning and makes me excited about being here.”

“And I love sharing with people that at the end of the day our highest calling, our greatest obligation is to these students and their family members,” Brent concluded. “We can’t afford to get it wrong. We can’t take shortcuts. I’m really proud of that.”

“In the past year, we have moved into a new facility. We have developed some new programs and initiatives. We have a dedicated, highly skilled staff in place. Our model of mentoring provides life-changing benefits for children, families and volunteers, and our program metrics are at an all-time high. With all of these ingredients in place, our greatest challenge, and our greatest opportunity, is to raise the funds that will allow us to serve more kids.”

“We have a lot to be thankful for, and much to look forward to.”

See our video interview with Brent Fields here

The Spirit of Giving

Many Bigs cite “wanting to give back” as their main reason for getting involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas. It’s not surprising then that they inspire this volunteer attitude in the Littles they mentor as well. On any given week you will find BBBS matches volunteering at animal shelters, working in community gardens, donating food to families in need, and doing many other service-oriented projects. So, after Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas coast, Bigs and Littles were ready to lend a helping hand.

Little Sister Tyranee and her Big Sister Janice have been matched for almost a decade. Spending time giving back to the community and to those in need is something that has become second nature to the pair. So, when they heard about ways the community could help hurricane victims, they got busy.

“Mayor Adler was on the news encouraging Austin to donate kits to the Hurricane Harvey evacuees,” Janice said. “My church was getting involved and I asked Tyranee if she wanted to help. Without hesitation she said, ‘Sure, I’d like to do whatever I can,’ and that just melted my heart.”

The two went shopping to get supplies for the hurricane relief kits as one of their regular outings. “I wanted her to have the opportunity to help someone else,” Janice explained. “We had a good time together gathering the items, but it also really helped Tyranee understand what was going on. She kept asking questions about what had happened. She said, ‘Where are the people?’, ‘They lost their homes? Oh, wow, I can’t imagine that.’”

“After we were finished she said, ‘It felt really good to help out.’ This project helped her realize that even when you don’t have a lot of resources, there are always things that you can do to help someone else.”

Tyranee, who is 18, also contributed some of her own money from her part-time job to the cause. A powerful demonstration of the impact the experience had on her – and an example of how someone who has overcome her own obstacles is helping others to overcome theirs. “Tyranee has been through a lot,” Janice continued. “She’s moved almost every year since we’ve been matched. She and her younger brother had opportunities to choose a different path in life that did not include completing high school and college. But they didn’t, and I’m so proud of them! They’ve been able to overcome difficulties of their own.”

Getting involved in the hurricane relief effort is just one example of how Janice has seen Tyranee grow since they’ve been matched. “I’ve seen Tyranee change tremendously, from being afraid of venturing out to try new things to now speaking up and getting involved,” Janice said. “My church, Wesley United Methodist, has offered her opportunities to speak in front of people through their different programs. That’s something Tyranee said she would never, ever do… but she has. The last time she spoke, I was sitting there video recording her and becoming very emotional at the same time. It’s just been amazing to see her growth.”

As they watch their Littles grow, Bigs often comment that their Littles will make good Big Brothers or Sisters one day. It’s something that frequently happens as former Littles pursue the opportunity to make a difference for others the way their own Bigs have made a difference for them.

Tyranee is now a high school senior and she wants to go to college, as does her younger brother. She plays on her high school’s volleyball team and is very interested in cosmetology. She is currently taking courses on the subject.  “It’s all because of BBBS that we were put together,” Janice remarked. “What an awesome organization.”

For Tyranee and Janice, as for the victims of Hurricane Harvey, it’s all about turning tough situations into something positive. “Tyranee has been through a lot, but she is moving forward in a positive way, that’s what is so awesome about her,” Janice said. “She has a beautiful heart. I know she’s going to do well in life.”