Zelda Botha on Coming to a New Place

“Our daughter and our lives were forever changed by the Big Brothers Big Sisters program of Central Texas,” began a recent BBBS Facebook post. “We were new immigrants with 4 children and 2 jobs each. We spoke Afrikaans at home. My daughter struggled…”  But there the message ended. Interested to learn more, we reached out to the mom who posted the comments and her family whose lives have been impacted by BBBS for over a decade.

Zelda Botha came to the United States from South Africa in 1994 with her husband and two children. “We were Afrikaners,” she said. “We didn’t speak English, only Afrikaans. We immigrated on religious visas. My husband and I are both ordained ministers.”

After landing in Virginia, the family quickly made their way to Central Texas and to jobs in Austin. “I always joke that Austin is the spot just before heaven,” said Zelda. “We really see ourselves as Texans and Americans.”

The Bothas were where they wanted to be, but that didn’t make the challenges of being an immigrant family any easier. “It’s really tough when you come as an immigrant,” said Zelda. “You don’t know the language. You don’t have family close by. You don’t understand the money. You don’t even know how to mail a letter back to family in South Africa.”

“Above all, you don’t have a social structure,” said Zelda. “In South Africa, when the schools are closed, all of the workplaces are closed too. It’s not like that in the U.S. Many times it was a real crisis for me because my kids could not go to school and I had no place to leave them while I was working because it takes time to make friends.”

Zelda and her husband often worked 2 jobs each to provide for their family. They even started their own business at one point. They worked for minimum wage and, in applying for jobs, were often treated as though they had just come out of high school, despite their professional credentials and degrees.

Bigger challenges came, however, when their third child was born. “I had an unusual complication during my pregnancy that resulted in the baby having less room to develop. Consequently, Mikayla faced challenges just to survive.”

“When she was born, she seemed premature even though she’d been delivered at full-term, and she was always a little behind other children her age developmentally. She didn’t start speaking until she was close to school-age, and the challenges were magnified once school began.”

“This is actually where my journey with BBBS begins,” Zelda continued. “At this point, I was very busy. I had two older children, I had Mikayla, I also had Lauren, who is a year younger than Mikayla, and I was working.”

Mikayla was having trouble learning to read and the school she attended provided her with a volunteer tutor. One day, a BBBS staff member contacted Zelda about enrolling her daughter in the program.

“A representative from BBBS called and told me that my daughter’s tutor wanted to be her Big Sister outside of school,” said Zelda.

Zelda arranged a home visit to talk with a BBBS staff member, and she talked with Mikayla about having a mentor. “After learning more about BBBS, I started feeling more comfortable with the situation.”

Zelda was concerned about Mikayla’s disabilities, which often prompted her daughter to behave impulsively. “We were at a crisis point in Mikayla’s life,” said Zelda. “I discovered that Mikayla was struggling so much in school that she was acting out by taking the teacher’s things. I found all of these pens and colors hidden under Mikayla’s bed, and I realized there was a real problem.”

Being matched with a Big Sister turned the tide for Mikayla. She wasn’t matched with her reading tutor after all, but with an older Big Sister named Cayla. “BBBS’ staff decided that Mikayla needed a more mature Big Sister,” said Zelda. “When the two started forming a bond, Mikayla loved it. Plus, having a Big whose name was similar to hers was a big deal. Our Bigs’ names became very important to my daughters.”

During her school years, Mikayla had several different Bigs, but each made a positive impact. “When she was younger, one of her Bigs had a disability,” said Zelda. “She also had a Ph.D.  That helped Mikayla understand that, even with disabilities, she could be successful.”

Mikayla’s younger sister, Lauren, wanted a mentor as well. “Lauren was constantly asking, ‘When am I going to get a Big Sister?’” Zelda laughed. “And she wanted a Big who had the same name she did, just like Mikayla’s Big had a similar name.”

“I thought, ‘This is going to be hard,’ but BBBS found a Big with a similar name and it was a perfect match. I was amazed.” said Zelda.

Mikayla and Lauren both started out with Bigs who had names that matched their own. Years later, they both had Bigs named Sara. Regardless of the names, Zelda credits all of the Bigs in their lives with motivating her daughters and offering them glimpses of lifestyles and opportunities that were different than the ones they knew at home.

She also cites the Bigs as being an important source of support when her family experienced serious problems. Zelda and her husband divorced, and she was then diagnosed with cancer. “The girls’ Big Sisters were really a comfort. Their mentoring relationships were not just fun and games. Our family struggles were a real burden for the kids,” said Zelda. “If you have a big family, your family comes alongside you when you have troubles. Immigrant families don’t often have that. The girls’ Bigs were like extended family members the kids could lean on and learn from. They were people my girls could trust and share deep concerns with, and who were genuinely interested in their well-being.”

Now, after 10 years, as Mikayla’s and Lauren’s matches are winding down, evidence of the relationships’ impacts can be seen in the successes the girls are experiencing. Lauren holds a 4.2 GPA in the Austin Global Studies program at Austin High School, is the leader of the debate team, and spent the summer studying in Italy – an opportunity she applied for on her own with her Big Sister’s guidance.

Mikayla, who was initially identified as a student who was at risk to fail, graduated early from Austin High with distinction after taking 36 hours of dual credit, college level classes. She is enrolled at UT Tyler where she plans to study computer science.

“I challenge anyone to search their hearts to see if they can be a Big,” said Zelda, “because you can make a world of difference in a child’s life. And you don’t know the impact that child will then have in the world. All the wonderful people we have known at, and through, BBBS have impacted my kids’ lives in a positive way. These relationships have made a lasting, and important, difference.”

Spotlight on Lorie Barzano

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas works hard to make successful, long-lasting matches between Bigs and Littles, but a similar mindset extends to the agency’s fundraising and grant application processes as well. This is a key focus for Lorie Barzano, BBBS’ grants manager, who works to find foundations and grant-making organizations that mesh well with BBBS’ culture, philosophy and mission.

“I research foundations to find out about their priorities,” said Lorie. “I’m looking to see if they are a good fit for BBBS. That is an imperative, that they are a good match for us. Looking for funding from organizations that don’t match what we do is counterproductive.”

Part of determining a good fit means spending a lot of time doing research. It is a process that can take hours or days. “I look for foundations that are similar to BBBS in mission, vision, policies and priorities,” said Lorie. “Some of the things I look for are if they are focused on education, serving youth – particularly at-risk youth, and serving minority communities. I also look at whether they have an emphasis on family engagement, on single-parent households, and on advancing the needs of women and single moms.”

Once she determines which foundations to contact, the grant submission process begins, which can involve anywhere from 2 to 5 steps. It is not a matter of simply applying for funding. “Foundations may require a letter of intent, a full proposal, a presentation before the foundation’s representatives, and even a site visit to BBBS before considering our submission,” said Lorie.

Once a grant is secured, Lorie then keeps the foundation informed about BBBS’ activities, such as the number of children served, match activities planned, and how the money provided is being utilized.

It’s a lot of information to handle for a single foundation, let alone the 50-60 that BBBS works with. “I’m generally keeping 2-3 balls in the air at the same time,” Lorie laughs, “because each foundation has its own requirements and deadlines for submissions, and for follow-up reports.”

For Lorie, just like for BBBS’ mentoring services, it all comes down to building a personal connection. “It’s all about developing relationships,” said Lorie. “It’s about that one-to-one connection, and about reaching out to the foundations to keep them informed about, and connected with, what we do.”

That personal, peopled-focused aspect of the job is what has kept Lorie in the non-profit field for most of her career. “I never really looked at other industries because the kind of work I do has always been more important to me than the size of the paycheck or climbing the corporate ladder,” said Lorie. “I need to do something I believe in.”

Lorie has followed that philosophy from her childhood home in Chicago, to working in San Francisco, central New Mexico, and ultimately BBBS in Austin. “I’ve always believed in BBBS’ mission, and in the power of one-to-one mentoring,” she said. “It gives me a lot of satisfaction to raise money for programs for at-risk kids.”

“It also gives me a lot of satisfaction understanding a foundation’s needs and meeting those, while also meeting the needs of kids who need help. I enjoy balancing those things and producing positive outcomes.”

When not working on grant proposals, Lorie enjoys spending time with her partner Moye and her daughter Erin, who attends The University of Texas at Austin. “I also enjoy reading and my favorite author is Virginia Wolfe,” she said. “I like reading the classics and poetry. I also spend time practicing yoga. It helps keep me centered.”

Staying centered is crucial to handling the stressful deadlines Lorie has to deal with, but she quickly adds that no one at BBBS has an easy position. “Everyone has a job description that fills a big need in the organization,” she explained. “And I recognize how important each of our different functions is for this organization to be successful. We are a lean and fine-tuned organization, and we are fortunate to have a very talented team.”

Across Two Generations: A Look at Mentoring’s Long-Term Positive Impact

It’s often said that a mentor makes a long-term positive impact on the life of a child. For former Little Brother Anson Wilkinson, however, this impact has influenced not only his own life. Its reach has extended into the next generation as a positive influence in the life of his daughter, and recently matched Little Sister, Azia.

Anson’s mother enrolled him in Big Brothers Big Sisters when he was a boy, not long after his father passed away. Having a Big in his life meant having a companion for playing video games and basketball, visiting museums and aquariums, and rooting for the Oklahoma State Cowboys.

“I felt like I had a friend of my own,” says Anson.

His Big also offered “little lessons that became life lessons,” he says, teaching him how to change a tire, mow the lawn and fix things around the house. Perhaps the most significant impact of having a Big Brother, however, was having someone to talk with about his future, his goals and his outlook on life.

“He helped me look at life from beyond my own perspective,” Anson says.

Years later, with his daughter struggling through a difficult transition of her own, Anson returned to Big Brothers Big Sisters—this time as a parent. He knew from his own positive experience, that a Big Sister could become another trusted person in Azia’s life– someone she could talk to and feel supported by.

“I wanted to give my daughter the same opportunity to have her life influenced for the best,” he says. “I thought this would be perfect.”

And just as Anson anticipated, Azia has thoroughly enjoyed being a Little Sister.

It’s been just a few months since their match, but Azia and her Big Sister Audrey have already enjoyed some classic summer activities together, like cooling off with sno-cones and visiting the bowling alley. They’ve also sought out some new experiences, including a visit to the Domain shopping center to sample a variety of international foods.

“Azia enjoys the friendship and social outlet she gets with her Big,” says her father. “They do fun things together, but they also confide in one another.”

Anson feels confident that Azia’s experience with Big Brothers Big Sisters will continue to have a positive impact on her life, both now and in the long-term—perhaps even into a third generation.

Ice Ball 2018 An Unprecedented Success For Our Kids!

It was the coolest event on one of the hottest nights in Austin as Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas’ 14th annual Ice Ball gala exceeded all expectations. A record-breaking $850,000+ was raised – a $200,000 increase over last year – with donations still coming in and final numbers expected to exceed this early total.

A sold-out crowd attended the special event which was held for the first time at the Fairmont Austin hotel on Saturday, August 25. The black-tie affair was an elegant evening focused on raising funds to create more life-changing friendships between at-risk youth and caring adult mentors.

“We were honored to have over 800 generous friends and supporters gather to make a BIG difference for children in this community,” said Brent Fields, BBBS CEO.  “The unprecedented success of the event, with over $850,000 raised, will allow us to provide mentoring services to more than 700 kids who deserve the opportunity to reach their greatest potential.  We’re thrilled at the confidence and trust the community has placed in us to continue providing our transformational services for children and families in Central Texas.”

As attendees arrived, they were welcomed into a vibrant pre-event gallery where they enjoyed opportunities to take event photos beside the gala’s signature ice sculpture, and visit a pop-up shop filled with items from Kendra Scott’s new fall jewelry line. Guests also participated in a Big Board mini live auction, bid on numerous exclusive silent auction items, and purchased raffle tickets for a chance to win a trip for 4 to New Orleans, Miami, Chicago or Montreal.

A Dixieland band, Memphis Train Revue, led guests into the ballroom for the main portion of the evening where they enjoyed a delicious dinner, an exciting live auction, and a mission-centered ‘Fund A Friendship’ donation drive. Emcee Quita Culpepper, with KVUE-TV, got the program started.

New to Ice Ball 2018 was auctioneer Heath Hale and the Cowboys. This team has raised over $14 million for charities this year.  Using the classic auctioneer patter, Heath and his team motivated the inspired crowd to bid top dollar on many exciting auction packages.

The gala’s 2018 live auction packages included a UT tailgate party for 30 to 40 guests at Sour Duck Market, a King Ranch hunt with Colt McCoy, a wine lover’s trip to the Burgundy wine region of France, a dove hunt in Argentina, a golf trip and 5-night stay at a baronial castle in Scotland, a luxury trip to Jackson Hole, Wyoming with a scenic tour of the Grand Tetons, and a “choose your own adventure” package featuring trips to 20 different world-wide destinations, among others.

A surprise addition to the live auction came courtesy of Austin Police Chief Brian Manley. The Chief offered guests the opportunity to bid on an officer ‘ride-along’ experience to demonstrate the police department’s support for BBBS.

A highlight of the evening was the match story featuring Big Brother Chris and his Little Brother Keontray. Their relationship provided attendees with a powerful example of the life-changing impacts Big Brothers Big Sisters’ services have for children and adults alike.

“The Austin community came out and really supported our kids Saturday night!  It was a packed house!” said Lauren Portley, Vice President of Development for BBBS.  “Our mission takes precedence in planning this annual event, and BBBS’ Executive Board, Ice Ball Host Committee, and staff worked so hard to pull off what turned out to be our best Ice Ball yet!  At the end of the day, it’s all about serving our kids and making life-changing friendships that allow children to achieve their biggest possible futures.”

At the end of the evening, Ashley and Justin Yarborough, this year’s Ice Ball Gala Chairs, and the 2018 Ice Ball Host Committee, were recognized for hosting such an exceptional event. The celebration continued into the early morning hours as everyone enjoyed dancing to the music of Memphis Train Revue, and, as this year’s gala came to a close, guests left knowing that their support for Ice Ball 2018 will make a positive difference for hundreds of children in Central Texas for years to come.

See Ice Ball event photos here

Watch our BBBS Mission video here

See our Match Story video here

See photo booth photos here

Special thanks to our top sponsors:

BB&T, Big Bend Brewing Co., Kendra Scott; Heritage Title Company, RSM, US Micro Products; Sam Bassett, BMC Software Inc., The Christopher & Ross Families, Dr. Achal & Rajal Dhruva, Heather & Dominick Granato, H-E-B Tournament of Champions, Moody Bank, Connie & Bill Nelson, Pape-Dawson Engineers, Parsley Energy, ScaleFactor, Thessaly Startzell & Sam Burd, Candy & Rhett Stone, Strangeworks, Texas Capital Bank, Urbanspace, Wells Fargo, and Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich, & Rosati Foundation.

Breaking the Ice with Your Little: Suggestions from a Long-Time Match

“I was pretty nervous,” says Big Sister Kathy Garin about her first meeting with 15-year-old Little Sister Rachelle three years ago. “I was looking for a way to break the ice.”

Kathy’s confidence grew, however, as she and Rachelle discovered that they shared an adventurous spirit, and both loved trying new things. Seeking out activities that were new to both soon became Kathy and Rachelle’s favorite way of spending time together.

“That’s how our relationship evolved,” says Kathy.

For their first foray into the unknown, Kathy and Rachelle decided they would seek out the best pies in Central Texas– an accolade they ultimately bestowed on the Texas Pie Company of Kyle.

Over their three years as a match, they’ve continued to discover new things together –new tastes (Korean kimchi fries), new places (Texas’ first cat cafe), new outdoor adventures (stand up paddle boarding) and much more!

Their spirit for adventure isn’t all they shared, however. Over time, they discovered a common passion for music and choral performance that provided ongoing opportunities for nurturing their relationship.

“We were paired very, very well,” says Kathy. “We’ve discovered so many common interests!”

For Kathy and Rachelle, the creative explorations that began three years ago have fostered a relationship that remains strong. Although they may share adventures less frequently now that Rachelle is planning for college and Kathy’s job often takes her out of town, Kathy feels confident that her relationship with her Little Sister will endure.

“She can’t get rid of me,” Kathy laughs. “I know we’ll be in each other’s lives for a long time!”

For new Bigs and Littles, however, who may be unsure of how to get started, Kathy enthusiastically recommends a “choose your own adventure” approach for breaking the ice. Here’s a list of some of her and Rachelle’s favorite food and drink discoveries to inspire new matches:

Texas Pie Company – Take the scenic backroads to Kyle’s Texas Pie Company, where the motto is “Life is Short, Eat More Pie.” Choose from a wide selection of 4” individual sized pies, including Buttermilk, Southern Pecan, Strawberry Peach, Peanut Butter Mousse, Key Lime, and more, or take home a 10” pie to savor all week long! Just in case pies aren’t your thing, you’ll also find a tasty selection of other fresh, handmade baked goods, casseroles, quiches and sandwiches. 202 W. Center St., Kyle. Monday-Friday: 10:30 am-6:30 pm, Saturday: 10:30 am-4 pm, closed Sunday. (512) 268-5885.

Tiny Pies – Located in north-central Austin, Tiny Pies offers up yummy bite-sized pies, including sweet and savory classics, unique combinations (like Pumpkin Chai and Blackberry Balsamic) and rotating favorites inspired by seasonal ingredients.  With this seasonal emphasis, the menu is always changing, so be sure to call ahead if there’s something special you’re looking for. 5035 Burnet Rd., Austin. Monday-Friday: 10 am-8 pm, Saturday: 9 am-7 pm, closed Sunday. (512) 916-0184.

Blue Cat Café – One of Kathy and Rachelle’s favorite and most unique destinations, Blue Cat Café is Texas’ first cat café. Bringing together adorable, adoptable kitties with delicious food and coffee, the café’s prime objective is to find forever homes for stray and shelter cats. Visitors pay a $5 cover fee for the opportunity to mingle with and pet the cats, play board games, enjoy music and art or even take part in Kitty Yoga on Sunday mornings! 95 Navasota St., Austin. Monday-Thursday: 10 am-8 pm; Friday and Saturday: 10 am-10 pm; Sunday: 11 am-7 pm. (512) 766-5003.

Summer Moon Coffee Bar – Enjoy a cup of “coffee unplugged” at Summer Moon! This family-run establishment crafts custom coffee roasts using fair-trade, organic beans in a wood-fired, brick roaster they designed and built by hand. Rachelle loves to drink Mocha Moon, while Kathy’s favorite treat is the lemon poppy seed muffin. Locations in North and South Austin, Buda, Kyle, Westlake, Cedar Valley, San Marcos and San Antonio! Hours vary by location.

Andy’s Frozen Custard – One of Rachelle and Kathy’s first discoveries, Andy’s Frozen Custard in Round Rock, remains one of their favorite places to share desserts and catch up on life. They both enjoy frozen custard’s thick, creamy texture and smoother consistency than traditional ice cream and Andy’s abundant menu offerings. 1700 E. Palm Valley Blvd. #800, Round Rock. Open daily, 11 am-11 pm. (512) 687-2786.

Enjoy!

Hobie Day 2018

It was a beautiful day on the water as Bigs and Littles got to exercise their “sea-legs” at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas’ 2018 Hobie Day. Approximately 100 matches showed up at Bob Wentz Park on Lake Travis to experience the unique adventure that is catamaran sailing courtesy of the Austin Cats, a group of sailing enthusiasts who have hosted the event for close to 40 years.

Big Brother Jeff and his Little Brother Caden had a great time at the event. “We enjoy just being out on the lake, learning more about the Hobie Cats, and sailing in general,” said Jeff. “And Jim, our guide, did an awesome job of explaining everything. Caden even got to do some trampolining, where you hang over the side of the Hobie Cat. It was amazing.”

Many of the matches just enjoyed having a chance to be outdoors and enjoy the water. “Caden is really a gamer kid. He likes video games. So, any time we can get outside, we want to take advantage of it,” said Jeff. “We appreciate BBBS having this event, and the Austin Yacht Club, and the Austin Cats crew, that puts it on. We’ll be back every year that we don’t have a conflict.”

Other Bigs and Littles, like Christina and her Little Sister Isis, saw the day as an opportunity to have an adventure. “It’s our first time to be at Hobie Day,” said Christina. “It’s just nice to have this event and to have it on these boats. We’re excited to have the opportunity to go on an adventure like this together.”

It was an adventure Isis wasn’t totally sure about at the beginning. “I’ve never been on a boat before,” she said, “but I think it is going to be cool and I’m only a little bit scared.”

Following the ride, Isis was all smiles as she struck a victory pose when she got off the boat. She couldn’t stop talking about how fun and relaxing it was riding across the lake, and how much she enjoyed using a squirt gun to shoot water at her brother who was in another boat.

The Austin Cats supplied five catamarans for the rides throughout the afternoon. They also spent time preparing for, and hosting, the event.  In addition to the boat crews, the Young Men’s Service League Westlake Chapter and Cavalier’s Chapter provided volunteers who helped with tasks like equipping attendees with life jackets, assisting people as they got onto the boats, and cleaning up after the event.

“This is my first time volunteering with BBBS and already, in just the 1 ½ hours I’ve been here, what I’ve seen of the Bigs’ and Littles’ relationships is precious, more than precious,” said Michelle Hogan, of the YMSL Westlake.  “It is special to see all these Bigs spending time with children who need an extra loved one in their lives.”

For one match, Hobie Day 2018 marked the ten-year anniversary of their match relationship. Tom and his Little Brother Jordan spent their first outing as a Big and a Little at a Hobie Day event 10 years ago. “When we were first matched Jordan was 6-years-old and he was a tiny, little guy,” said Tom. “In the picture I have from that time, I had to bend down to be beside him in the shot. Now, ten years later, he’s about to be taller than me.”

“I used to be scared of the water,” said Jordan. “but I’m not scared any more, so today will be fun.”

Tom said that, early on, he tried to take Jordan swimming for some of their outings, but that he wouldn’t swim. “In year two I could see that he had decided, ‘I’m going to do this,’ and now he’s a great swimmer,” said Tom. “I don’t think we’ve missed many Hobie Days.”

Hobie Day is a BBBS event where Bigs and Littles get to spend time with the Little’s family members as well. In addition to sailing, attendees enjoyed swimming, eating pizza, playing games and lounging along the shoreline.

Special thanks to our great event partners – the Austin Cats, the Young Men’s Service League Cavaliers, the Young Men’s Service League Westlake, Domino’s Store #6384, and Howard Barnett with Zilker Park Boat Rentals – for their support and involvement. Thanks, too, to our staff, Bigs, Littles and their families for making Hobie Day 2018 such a special day.

See photos from the day in our 2018 Flickr album here

Double the Impact – The Veliz Sisters

Being Little Sisters is twice as much fun for Alicia and Raquel. As siblings who are both BBBS Littles, they have twice the Bigs, twice the outings, twice the BBBS scholarship funds, and twice the support for their future plans. Alicia and Raquel are the first in their family to attend college, and after hearing about their goals, it’s clear that these young women are well on their way to achieving success in the world.

Children in a single-parent household, the two were matched with Big Sisters during their middle school years at the urging of their aunt who’d seen the benefits of BBBS’ program.  Alicia, the oldest, is matched with Big Sister Kyra, and she is the more reserved of the two. Raquel is matched with Sarah, and she describes herself as talkative and outgoing. Despite, or maybe due to, their differences, both sisters agree that having Bigs in their lives has made a difference.

“(My Big Sister) Sarah encourages me to be myself, and that’s something I really like about her,” said Raquel. “My mom is very supportive, but she had us when she was so young that she didn’t really get to have a childhood herself. She doesn’t know how to let me be creative, whereas Sarah does. It’s nice to have someone say ‘You can do this. Don’t be afraid.’”

Raquel and her Big are often mistaken for being biological sisters. “She’s very much like me,” said Raquel. “She is super adventurous and she loves to try new things. She always wants to make things, or go to a coffee shop and play board games. I love that. And I can talk to her about anything, and she listens and shares her experiences.”

Alicia agrees that having a Big who is encouraging and a confidante has been a plus in her life, particularly since the biological sisters have very different personalities and were not really close growing up. “(My Big Sister) Kyra has taught me a lot about being professional but not forgetting to have fun,” said Alicia. “We like to be silly, but then Kyra will turn around and give me advice on getting a good credit score. Then we’ll go back to being silly again. Part of what I’m learning is how to keep my business life separate from my personal life.”

It’s an important skill to have, as Alicia is pursuing a major in business management. She recently completed her first year at the University of Texas at San Antonio and she is working as an intern at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas this summer.

Raquel, on the other hand, is a recent high school graduate who is planning to attend Franklin University in Switzerland this fall. She will be studying Environmental Science, but she also plans to get certified to teach English as a Second Language internationally. The opportunity to study abroad is something she simply took a chance on.

“I applied to a lot of different colleges, but Franklin University is the only international school among them,” said Raquel. “The University is supposed to send out acceptance letters before the end of May, and I received mine the very last week. I was nervous. A friend kept saying, ‘If you get in, you have to go. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.’”

“It’s going to be hard being so far away, and it’s going to be hard on my mom, but I’m lucky she’s so supportive,” Raquel admitted. “My Big Sister has also been very supportive. She studied abroad for a year, and she’s been telling me about her experiences, which has helped.”

How will Alicia feel about her sister being so far away? “I’m trying to play it cool. I’m trying to pretend that I’m not going to miss her, but – honestly – I will,” said Alicia. “When Raquel is gone I won’t have anyone pushing me to do fun stuff, even when I don’t want to. When I give in, I always have to admit that I enjoyed it. I just don’t want to tell her!”

The pair have agreed to video chat each week to keep in touch while Raquel is away. Alicia is also saving money to visit Raquel in Switzerland. But each sister plans to give the other space to grow while working toward her own goals.

“Ultimately, I want to own a bakery,” said Alicia, “or possibly go to culinary school after college.” It’s a goal her sister wants her to achieve as well.

“I want Alicia to have a bakery,” said Raquel. “I’ve also thought about how I want my life to be. I want to go to college, get my teaching certificate, teach, retire, then work at Google or somewhere else as a translator, and make a lot of money so that I can get a home for my mom, help my sister get a bakery, and just help my family out because they have supported and helped me.”

She adds, “Of course, sometimes you want one thing, but life throws you another. I like that about life.”

The sisters are both community-minded. They volunteer at events in their neighborhood. Their favorite activity is feeding the homeless at the annual H-E-B Feast of Sharing. They are also supportive of BBBS. Each received a college scholarship from BBBS’ Scholarship Program and each can see themselves becoming a Big Sister one day.

“Working as an intern, it’s been cool to see what actually happens behind the scenes at BBBS,” said Alicia. “I didn’t realize what goes into making a match happen. There’s a lot more to it than I realized. It’s made me appreciate BBBS even more. Part of my internship has involved finding resources for Bigs, and I’ve enjoyed helping them out. I can’t wait until I can become a Big, but I want to be financially stable before I do. I know it’s a long process, but it will be worth it.”

Raquel adds, “I’m always talking to my friends about BBBS, and I’m definitely interested in being a Big.”

Whether they end up overseas or stay in Central Texas, there’s no doubt these sisters will be making a positive mark in the world, representing their family and BBBS, and giving back in a big way.